Climate change is happening now and local governments must play a significant role in reducing emissions and helping people cope with the impacts. Austin has existing climate commitments and has made progress in expanding its use of renewable energy, but many challenges remain.

On October 9, Solar Austin, 350 Austin, Earth Day Austin, and Shades of Green are hosting a City Council Climate & Energy Forum for City Council candidates from Districts 8 & 9 to speak to Austinites about their climate change and energy priorities. Five candidates will be joining us for the forum:
City Council District 8: Rich DePalma, Bobby Levinski
City Council District 9: Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo, Danielle Skidmore, Linda O’Neal

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 @ 6:30pm – 9:00pm
Climate and Energy Candidate Forum – Austin City Council Districts 8 & 9
Wildflower Church
1314 E Oltorf St, Austin, Texas 78704

All candidates were required to respond to a written questionnaire in order to participate. Their answers are available below.

Click on a candidate’s name to read their responses.

City Council District 8

Bobby Levinski
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?
My top three priorities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions would be (i) to shut down the Fayette Coal Plant (or, at least, the City’s portion thereof), which produces the majority of the City of Austin’s greenhouse gas emissions and a sizeable portion of the city’s at-large; (ii) invest in dedicated right-of-way to make transit a more viable option for commuters, by improving speed and reliability, and thereby reduce emissions from reducing trips by single occupancy vehicles; and (iii) better integrate the water-energy nexus into our utility planning, so that we are both more efficient with our water and energy use, such as using graywater to pipe through our chiller plants (as an environmental attorney who has a been a bit more focused on the water side of things, I think I can help quite a bit in this regard). I understand that there has been some ongoing legal conversations with regard to Fayette and our co-ownership of the plant with the LCRA. I think the first action I would need to take is getting up to speed on those conversations that have occurred with the City’s counsel, and then do everything I can to help make the consolidation of our city’s interest happen so we can shut down one of the units.

2. As council member, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
I mentioned the legal conversations with the LCRA above, but beyond that, we need to putting the utility in a good place from both a financial and operational perspective to enable to the switch to occur. We aren’t far off our goals, but it will require continued investment in renewable energy generation, and I’d like to build up the reserve fund a bit to help stabilize rates should the unexpected happen. We need to be well-armed with sound financials, so we can push back against the State’s interference.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes, my immediate priority would be helping our school districts install solar so that we easing some of their costs, given their current budgetary constraints. As a policy advisor to MPT Tovo, I helped ensure our energy efficiency programs were expanded to lower-income resident, because the savings that can result can have an enormous impact on a families month-to-month budget. I would love to help expand solar access for lower-income families, and partnering with multi-family complexes to provide savings to renters makes a ton of sense. Count me in.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes, distributed-scale solar is an economically sound investment for our utility in reducing transmission and infrastructure costs. It’s no longer an idea for the future; it’s a necessity now so we can have a future.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
I appreciate this question, because this is a topic that has been brought up to me by some of our first responders on the campaign trail. Our public safety needs our changing and growing, as we experience the consequences of climate change. For EMS, especially, I think there needs to be a broader recognition of the community health service they provide–especially during extreme heat and drought. And, of course, we have seen the other side of it, with flooding caused by extreme rain events. The most immediate conversation that our City must have is how we are treating drainage in our community. We need to revise the land development code to require that redeveloping responsibility control for drainage on their properties, and we need to invest in open space acquisitions upstream that can mitigate flooding consequences downstream.

With regard to being a regional steward, I think we learned a lot from Hurricane Katrina and Rita. I was working for council at the time, and I think we can all agree that the collective after-action report was that we were unprepared. We established the Office of Emergency Management and began to prepare better. We are in a much better place now to serve that role for our neighbors, but we of course need to stay on top of it.

Rich DePalma
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?

Priority One – Reduce GHG in from cars and trucks.
Strategies include:
(i) Go beyond the the 2016 Fleet Electrification Study and Plan recommendations prioritizing light duty cars, SUVs, trucks, and equipment. The current plan of 330 plug-in electric vehicles by 2020 is not aggressive enough given the size of the city’s fleet (even the smaller amount of cars and SUVs). Financial challenges is understable but unless the city is locked into existing contracts on the remaining light duty cars, then the City should release a Request for Information that details its entire fleet (including year, model, make, mileage, existing contractual obligations) and seek information on what the private sector market would offer. The City must leverage purchasing power to replace the fleet at a higher rate. Currently, the fleet refresh/replacement schedule is only done in small numbers and definitely not at a level to warrant deep discounts. We need an analysis that includes the financial impact from moving away from traditional municipal lease to purchase agreements to straight lease agreements. The analysis should include maintenance costs comparing against a three year lease scenario versus total cost of ownership. For the remaining fleet, we must transition to alternative fuel as quickly as possible.
(ii) Invest in a robust transit infrastructure. It is imperative that we move residents from cars to other forms of sustainable transportation methods. This includes light rail, bus, commuter rail, electric shuttles, autonomous vehicles, bikes, e-bikes, e-scooters and possibly even ferry.

Priority Two – Reduce GHG from Residential and Commercial Electricity Consumption.
Strategies include:
(i) Retire the Fayette Power Plant. Coal is the largest producer of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States and the city must close Fayette. The community needs to identify and implement a way to pay off all the costs associated with closing the plant.
(ii) Continue to Move Toward Renewable Energy Options. The city must continue to pursue a mix of entering into Power Purchase Agreements for utility scale solar and wind farms along with localized rooftop solar. The Austin Energy Community Power program is an exciting opportunity for renters and others who do not have the ability to incorporate solar on to the property to receive the benefits of rooftop solar. I believe there is another opportunity to work with a third party operator for a lease purchase solar rooftop program. This program would be implemented by a third party (who can receive the tax credits and manage the program) and heavily coordinated with Austin Energy and Development Services who will help with program implementation. A successful program will address issues associated with upgrading existing electrical boxes and roofs. The program could allow for a lien on a property where in the event of a sale, the remaining loan is paid off. If structured correctly, this program could operate in a similar manner to an Energy Savings Performance Contract where solar, any needed infrastructure, and other energy improvements could be locked into the loan which is included in the utility payment. This would provide flexibility for a homeowner whose roof and electrical system is solar ready but also provide a solution to a homeowner who has an aging roof and electrical system. In the later instance, the program could help low income owners keep their home.
(iii) Energy Savings Performance Contracting. Perform a directed engineering study on all City of Austin facilities and pursue an energy savings performance contract to address lighting, solar panel installation, energy controls, and other mechanical systems. This should have been done years ago. We should not be using bond money for energy efficiency projects when it can be done through an ESPC.

Priority Three – Large Scale Carbon Capture Program.
The City of Austin with its partners (such as TreeFolks where I am board president) need to fully implement a comprehensive urban reforest and carbon capture program. The City’s urban forest has an estimated four million tree deficit since the 1970s. A robust carbon capture program that includes our headwaters, creeks, Eastern Travis County, and other parts of the city will help reduce our carbon while also cleaning our water and building our green stormwater infrastructure. The pilot program is currently stuck in Austin’s bureaucracy. I have been a part of this project and it is a passion project for me. I will aggressively pursue it as a city council member.

2. As council member, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
Step One – Work with my renewable energy advisor, Kaiba White of Public Citizen to determine the latest options.
Step Two – Direct the City Manager to Release an Request for Information for Innovative Solutions, Services and Materials directly relating to meeting the 2015 Austin Community Climate Plan and assess responses.
Step Three – Implement the Austin Energy Resource, Generation and Climate Protection Plan to 2027 (2027 Plan).
Step Four – Implement the more aggressive steps in question one.
Step Five – Review the 100% Carbon-Free Energy by 2030 model requested in the 2027 Plan and assess additional options.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes, it is important. I support expanding the community solar program along moving toward a solar program (with possible layered funding from other programs) that would assist low-income individuals in adding solar to their homes where the roof, electrical, lighting and possibly mechanical also need to be upgraded. The details of this program are provided in the answer (ii) of question of 2 above.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes. The cost of local, distributed scale solar installation is more expensive than utility scale solar farms but utility scale solutions also come with a cost of using land that is likely undeveloped. We must find the right mix.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
In August 2017, when Hurricane Harvey hit the South Texas Coast, I was present as a member of the Austin Independent School District’s (AISD) Facilities and Bond Planning Advisory Committee to see first hand at LBJ High School the coordinate response our City, County, and AISD had in in assisting our neighbors along the coast impacted by Hurricane Harvey. I was impressed with the response but there were improvements that needed such as as mobility, recreation for kids, full restrooms, and better information exchange. Our city government has a role in
actively assisting with emergency rescues, local housing, school placement, food, transportation, medical attention, and even job placement for those displaced by extreme weather events. It is a moral responsibility.

City Council District 9

Danielle Skidmore
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?

1. Embrace emerging technology and innovations. To accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles, we need to continue to work with Austin Energy to increase availability of electric vehicle infrastructure for both the municipal fleet and the city at large. The city can and should continue to provide funding and resources to transition the fleet to electric vehicles where practical. I will also work proactively with Capital Metro to help achieve the Project Connect vision of electric high-capacity transit. More generally, for the sake of our environment, we finally need to go big on public transportation. That means embracing technology to ensure faster, safer movement around our city, but also going back to the basics: a robust bus service, and sidewalks that that allow our citizens to walk (or roll) to where they need to be.
2. Overhaul public transportation. To implement this transportation reboot in Austin, we need someone with the both the technical skillset and political will to guide that process to fruition; we need someone with a long term vision that necessarily includes making policy changes to save the environment, such as going big on public transportation. If we want public transportation to be as big as it should be in Austin, we must give commuters viable alternatives to driving single occupancy vehicles and provide relatively inexpensive incentives to use transit. Movability Austin is doing good work in this area, but we need to expand the effort to give people economic incentives to change their parking habits.
3. Link land development and transit efforts. Less driving means more living. I envision a walkable, bike-friendly Austin, with transit options that fit within or improve families’ budgets and lifestyles. In order to realize a more sustainable Austin, we must create more affordable and market rate housing in walking distance to transit corridors. As we look at our key Project Connect transportation corridors and Capital Metro Remap high frequency corridors, our land development code should allow higher densities on the corridors and also for a stair-step transition of “missing middle” housing—parallel to these corridors. Our density bonus program should also be revised to ensure this new housing comes with real community benefits to affordable housing programs.

2. As council member, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
The City should retain control over Austin Energy, but I do believe we could consider an independent board with real expertise in the energy industry to supplement Council’s leadership. I am proud of Austin Energy’s leadership in sustainable energy production and think setting aggressive goals to reduce fossil fuel dependence is laudable. I will work with Austin Energy’s leadership to balance these goals with affordability targets, with a focus on a robust public discussion of the cost and benefit data. More broadly, I also think it may be most cost effective to look at overall fossil fuel usage as a city, with targeted investments in our transportation infrastructure to reduce fossil fuel demand.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
I believe we must continue to expand access to multifamily and low income residents. Extending these benefits to these communities will require a shift in thinking in the incentive programs. As a resident of a downtown condominium with sub-metered electricity, I have not been able to easily participate in thermostat rebate programs due to the billing challenges. With respect to rooftop solar, similar challenges apply. Targeted outreach and programs for the HOA or property management could help expand the use of solar. The challenges are primarily billing/credit logistics and how to allocate this community benefit to individual units, and this could be addressed through the “virtual net metering” to program participants, as has been explored in California by their PUC:

“There are economic and technical challenges to installing one solar energy system in a multifamily housing complex where each tenant’s unit has a separate meter. This is true for affordable housing, as well as any multitenant environment. The VNM concept is designed to overcome the challenge of allocating benefits from a single solar energy system to tenants in multifamily housing whose units are individually metered. Under VNM, a single solar energy system sized to offset part or all of a building’s total load can be installed for the entire complex, but electricity produced by the system can be credited to individually metered tenants and to common areas of the building. Essentially, the electricity produced by the system would be net-balanced against total building electricity consumption, as if the building had a single, or “virtual,” master meter. Credits for solar energy system production would be allocated to all units (both tenant units and common areas) in a predetermined proportion. Staff recommends VNM credits could be allocated proportionally between tenant and common areas based on historical load data, and then allocated equally between tenants.”

Austin energy has a similar pilot program “Multifamily Shared Solar Pilot Program for Multi-Tenant Affordable Housing”, which should be expanded. Expanding Austin Energy credits to low income residents could be achieved in partnership with nonprofits, perhaps a solar cooperative that could pool costs and resources to add solar to other affordable housing programs.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
I absolutely support these investment programs. It is the duty of today’s energy companies to actively facilitate our broader societal transition to renewables, and incentivize families to opt into them now by offsetting their cost to do so.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
Great cities are serving as an example for the whole United States on these sustainability issues. When President Trump pulled us out of the Paris Climate Accord, mayors of cities committed to exert their local power by still upholding the tenets of the accord. Austin City Council can do the same, by taking the bold and necessary actions to help redefine our city’s mobility patterns in a way that both benefits our residents and combats climate change… but we need a champion on Council with the vision and skillset to make that happen. By realizing a compact, connected city (less pavement, more people) we reduce our need to drive and the amount of greenhouse gases we’re pumping into the atmosphere. This line of thinking will also help us accommodate more people in our city, in the instance of natural disasters that will surely increase as climate change intensifies. We need to make more room for people throughout Austin—remembering that we’re not just talking about transplants from California or wherever, but new children being born in Austin all the time, and potentially future climate refugees. We just have to make sure that making that space comes with a real and tangible commitment to community benefits; affordable housing, and minimizing displacement of current residents in our communities.

As far as local and regional effects of climate change, the clearest example for Texas has been a quantifiable increase in the frequency and intensity of floods. As a civil engineer practicing in transportation and drainage engineering, the data (NOAA Atlas 14) reaffirms what we all see: it’s raining harder and longer. This directly
impacts the City of Austin by increasing the amount of land, and the number of homes that are located within a floodplain. It is terrifying to see many of my projects, designed for a “100-year” flood, see floods of equal or greater size a couple of times in the span of a few years. This flooding has affected my work and my life greatly in this way, and I know that I will be able to use my political position for environmental change once I’m in office.

Flooding has been a prevalent issue seen as a result of climate change specifically in Austin. To reduce flooding dangers, we must continue to manage our development and near floodplains carefully. Austin does a good job of regulating floodplain development, but climate change is real. It’s raining harder now, and more often. This means that our floodplain maps will continue to change as stream flood intensity increases. From a policy standpoint, that means we need to reduce the number of vulnerable properties impacted by flooding, using programs such as
buyouts, where appropriate. The other piece of the flooding solution is to continue to support compact and connected cities, and to reduce sprawl. The redevelopment of existing impervious cover is better than expanding it; we must allow development to go up instead of out, which will help preserve more green-space in the process.

Drought is another impact of climate change seen within our city, and to survive future droughts, we must continue on our current path, where we’ve seen some good success with the Austin Water Utility, and I am excited to support the Water Forward Plan.

Kathie Tovo
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?

I believe that fighting climate change requires a multi-pronged approach in which we adopt a variety of policies that improve energy efficiency, increase our public and private use of renewable resources, and reduce our use of fossil fuels.

Some of my top priorities at the City related to this include retiring the Fayette Power Plant, electrifying our City fleet, and increasing private and public generation of solar and renewable energy resources. As a Council Member, I have worked toward each of these goals by supporting efforts to:
• Close the Fayette Power Plant, including supporting creating a cash reserve fund that we will use to pay off related debts so we can retire the plant.
• Identify a target for transitioning the City’s fleet to electric vehicles.
• Adopt an update to the Generation Plan that supports at least 330 new charging stations for electric vehicles by 2020.
• Approve a contract investing $3.2 million in electric vehicle infrastructure.
• Set aggressive goals for net zero public and private emissions through the Generation Plan and the Austin Community Climate Plan.
• Direct the City Manager to nearly triple the City’s portfolio of solar energy.
• Require new buildings be constructed in a way that allows them to be “solar ready.”

Additionally, I believe that we must work with our partners in Central Texas, such as CapMetro, to provide real mass transit solutions that can provide alternatives to driving. I have consistently supported urban rail and mass transit efforts. I was one of the only candidates citywide who supported the 2014 urban rail bond and have voted for projects at the City that will help provide two new train stations on the existing MetroRail line.

I look forward to continuing to lead on efforts at the City to close the Fayette Power Plant, electrify our fleet, and increase generation of renewable energy resources, as well as working with our CapMetro partners to bring Austin mass transit through Project Connect.

2. As council member, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?

I have been a strong and consistent voice leading the way on increasing renewable energy and moving away from fossil fuels. As a Council Member, I have led and supported efforts to:
• Establish the Austin Generation Resource Planning Task Force, which helped develop the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2030 for city- controlled resources.
• Adopt an Austin Community Climate Plan with the goal of achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions citywide by 2050.
• Direct the City Manager to nearly triple the City’s portfolio of solar energy.
• Require new buildings be constructed in a way that allows them to be “solar ready.”
• Establish a Joint Sustainability Task Force to advise Council on policies related to the Austin Community Climate Plan.
• Create a Low-Income Consumer Advisory Task Force to recommend ways the City can offer renewable energy and energy efficiency programs to less affluent residents.
• Support the Obama Administration’s “Clean Power Plan” to control greenhouse gas emissions.
• Close the Fayette Power Plant, including supporting creating a cash reserve fund that we will use to pay off related debts so we can retire the plant.

I have also led the way on protecting our Council control of Austin Energy, which has made action on renewable energy initiatives possible. As a Council Member, I successfully fought off an effort to turn Austin Energy over to an independent board and instead supported establishing the Austin Energy Oversight Committee to ensure continued Council control and leadership.

I look forward to continuing to push to set aggressive renewable energy goals, expand our renewable energy generation, implement innovative policies, move away from fossil fuels, and protect the local control that allows us to make real progress.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.

Yes. I believe it is important for the City to expand access to solar to residents of all means in our community. As a Council Member, I have worked on efforts to help less affluent residents participate in our energy efficiency and renewable energy programs by establishing the Low-Income Consumer Advisory Task Force. I believe we need to continue to look for opportunities to expand access and, importantly, to invest in robust outreach efforts that ensure meaningful participation in these programs.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.

Yes. I support expanding solar usage across our community. I helped lead on a successful effort to require new residential and commercial buildings be constructed in a way that allows them to be “solar-ready,” or able to be retrofitted for solar installation. Going forward, I will continue to look for opportunities to expand our
solar installation programs, make them accessible to residents of all means, and push for robust program participation.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
We know climate change is a serious problem, even though the president has called it a hoax created “to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive” and the Texas Republican Party’s official platform describes it as “a political agenda promoted to control every aspect of our lives” and actively calls for defunding climate initiatives.

With the state and federal governments actively undermining progressive efforts to fight climate change, it is extremely important that our local leaders stand up for sustainability.

I have led on climate change issues at Council, including the efforts at increasing renewable energy and decreasing fossil fuel use discussed earlier in this questionnaire. Additionally, I have led on efforts to increase our resiliency in the face of drought and extreme weather events.

Two of the key challenges we face related to climate change are ensuring a sustainable water supply in the face of intense droughts and a clean water supply in the face of extreme storms. I have led on water conservation and sustainability by launching the ambitious effort to create a plan to manage our resources responsibly and meet Austin’s water needs over the next 100 years, an effort known as “Water Forward.” That draft plan is currently being reviewed by our boards and commissions. I look forward to the Council reviewing and adopting Water Forward in
the months ahead and to continuing to implement progressive policies and programs that help us conserve our resources and grow sustainably. I also have a strong record of voting to uphold our water quality protections by opposing unnecessary variances to the Save Our Springs Ordinance and other means of circumventing our watershed standards.

We need to continue to move forward on policies that can make our community more resilient to climate change and can allow us to respond rapidly to emergencies. For instance, I believe that the City should explore ways to: improve our disaster preparedness and ability to shelter displaced individuals during emergencies, move toward “greenfield development standards” which would require developers to mitigate for their flooding impacts regardless of whether their project is a new development or a redevelopment, and expand our green infrastructure requirements to improve water quality. On the latter, I supported a Council budget item to invest in hiring a consultant to help City staff develop new green infrastructure requirements that may be able to help enhance the way we integrate nature and water quality features into our community.

If re-elected, I will continue to be a leader in fighting for policies that move us forward on climate change preparedness and resiliency.

Linda O'Neal
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?
a. Rider-friendly bus service. Shorter routes, faster pick up times, sheltered bus stops. If the bus was more convenient and had faster service, more people would take the bus
b. No coal in or near Austin.
c. Incentivize carpools.

2. As council member, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
a. Support wind and solar power

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
a. Yes.. Incentives work, but even with incentives, Austin has gotten so unaffordable; the extra costs are unattainable. Incentivize developers to install solar panels. Taxpayers can afford to incentivize developers for good behavior if we stop subsidizing corporations.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
a. Yes.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
a. Our biggest weather displacement is flooding. We need to use porous cover rather than impervious cover on streets that have very little traffic.