Climate change is happening now and local governments must play a significant role in reducing emissions and helping people cope with the impacts. Austin has existing climate commitments and has made progress in expanding its use of renewable energy, but many challenges remain.

On October 2, Solar Austin, 350 Austin, Earth Day Austin, and Shades of Green are hosting a Mayoral Climate & Energy Forum for mayoral candidates to speak to Austinites about their climate change and energy priorities. Four mayoral candidates will be joining us for the forum: Alex Stenger, Laura Morrison, Mayor Steve Adler, and Travis Duncan.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018 @ 6:30pm – 9:00pm
Mayoral Climate & Energy Forum
First Unitarian Universalist Church of Austin
4700 Grover Ave, Austin, Texas 78756

All candidates were required to respond to a written questionnaire in order to participate. Their answers are available below. Click on a candidate’s name to read their responses.

Alex Stenger
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?
As an avid cyclist, I strongly encourage alternative modes of transportation. We the people are overly reliant on the fossil fuel industry and that is largely due to the fact that our public transportation system is an absolute joke. As Mayor, I will work thoroughly to increase the reliability of our public transportation system and utilize our Electric Cabs and dockless scooters to serve as a liasons for our public transportation needs. I plan on working with our neighborhood associations in order to implement more bike lanes throughout our City. Furthermore, I believe that our city needs to do a better job of encouraging residents to place solar panels on their roofs so that we rely less on the Fayette Coal Plant.

2. As mayor, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
Yes. All City Owned buildings need to work towards complete sustainability for their power needs and we will design programs in order to incentivize home owners to put solar panels on their roofs.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes. This is a good idea that I fully support. We need to do whatever is in our power to save the planet. I, along with everybody else in Austin, want to live.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes. What’s there to explain? My answer is yes. We need to continue doing this.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
Extreme weather events. Saving humanity is good. We need to do a better job of fighting climate change not only here in Austin, but also in our neighboring cities. Our City needs to do a better job of interacting with our neighboring cities in order to ensure that they are as environmentally friendly as we are.

Laura Morrison
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?

Build high‐capacity transit. Vehicle emissions will soon overtake electrical generation as the main contributor to greenhouse gases in the Austin area. As our city continues to grow, we must find ways to significantly reduce the number of vehicles on our roads. As mayor, I will work with residents, Cap Metro and other governmental partners, to build high‐capacity transit in Austin.
As mayor, I will lead an effort for a successful transit proposal which must be community‐driven and must gain the support of broad coalitions, including organizations and individuals committed to the environment, job access, equity, and public health. It must include: proactive plans to minimize displacement that may arise from rising property values near planned transit centers; programs to stabilize local businesses that may be disrupted during constructions; and an innovative, realistic and transparent finance plan.
Many other cities, including some in Texas, have made recent strides in implementing high‐capacity transit, and we can learn from their success. We must also learn from Austin’s past mistakes. A major failure of the most recent light rail election was the planners’ rejection of community input on the proposed route, which undoubtedly contributed to its defeat at the polls.
Achieve the goal of retiring Fayette by 2022. I am proud of my strong environmental record on energy issues as a council member from 2008 ‐ 2014, a commitment I will continue as mayor. A key goal that we set in the 2014 Austin Energy Resource, Generation and Climate Protection Plan, was to set a retirement date for the Fayette Coal plant for the first time: 2022. Setting a goal is certainly an important first step, but not enough. As mayor I will work to ensure that the goal is met.
In particular, I will ask that quarterly progress reports on reaching the retirement goal be placed on the agenda of the Austin Energy Oversight Council Committee. We must adequately adequately address the particular challenge due to the fact that the City does not own any of the Fayette units outright. To highlight the importance of this goal to the City Manager, I would include its progress as an explicit element in his annual performance evaluation.
In addition, the cost of the retirement scenario must be planned for. The Austin Energy non‐nuclear decommissioning fund likely will need significant additions to cover the cost. I will ask the staff to provide recommendations on how to adequately prepare financially for the Fayette Plant retirement, beginning now if possible or, at a minimum, by including it as an element of the cost of service study that will be done for the next rate case.
As a Council Member, I led the 2013 effort to maintain City Council authority over Austin Energy to ensure that community values for climate protection and renewable energy remain integrated in its operations. The Austin Energy
Oversight Committee of the Whole was an outgrowth of that effort. The retirement of Fayette is a perfect example of how important that 2013 effort was.
Ensure peak‐carbon is reached by 2020 in Austin and raise community awareness on carbon emission reduction progress toward the 2050 goal. It is interesting to note the recent announcement that 27 major cities have achieved peak carbon as part of their local commitment to the Paris Agreement, while their populations and economies are growing. If Austin is to be part of the solution on climate change, we will need to meet that milestone by 2020, according to the report. An Austin plan to achieve this, if it exists, has not garnered attention, and would provide yet another means for monitoring our progress. In particular it could spotlight the frequency of running the Fayette plant which may be done at times even when renewable sources are available for the sake of financial gain and thus provide an opportunity for a discussion on the topic. As mayor, I will bring this action forward.
Given that individual choices impact greenhouse gas emissions, it is imperative that we take all opportunities such as a peak‐carbon goal, to engender individual behavioral changes. A near‐term goal to reach peak carbon is one such opportunity. But more can be done to enlist the community in taking action to reach the goal of being carbon free by 2050, by way of education and friendly competition.

2. As mayor, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
As a member of the Council that adopted a goal for Austin Energy power generation to be carbon free by 2030, I remain committed to that goal. As with the retirement of Fayette, I will ask that quarterly progress reports on an effort to reach this goal be placed on the agenda of the Austin Energy Oversight Council Committee. Council Resolution 20170817‐061 called for modelling on how to achieve the 2030 goal with a report to the Oversight Committee by September 2019. As mayor, I will take appropriate steps after hearing that report. To highlight the importance of this goal to the City Manager, I would include its progress as an explicit element in his annual performance evaluation.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes. Expanded access to rooftop solar programs will be a key element in meeting our 2030 goal to fully transition away from fossil fuels. I strongly support developing targeted programs and policies to help bring solar options to more low‐income residents and multi‐family housing tenants.
All people in Austin should be able to be part of our efforts to save the planet: environmental equity demands it and the savings using solar can have meaningful impacts on the budgets of families with lower incomes. There are great examples of programs to learn from, often discussed in the Union of Concerned Scientists monthly newsletter (which I read regularly).

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes. Increasing the use of local, distributed solar installations will be a key element in meeting our 2030 goal. I fully support expanding utility investment programs, including rebates, to promote local solar installations within the Austin Energy service area.
While I was on the Council, there was considerable push back against expanding our local solar goals. This led me to initiate the Local Solar Advisory Committee to do a deep dive into the costs and benefits of local solar. The Committee’s recommendations, which we subsequently adopted, were based not only on environmental considerations but economic analyses that showed strong potential for creation of jobs if a significant goal was adopted.
It is critical that we expand the utility investment programs to ensure those goals are met and hopefully exceeded.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
As the major city in our region, Austin must be prepared to take a lead role in responding to the local impacts of climate change, just as it must redouble its efforts to reduce greenhouse gases and other activities that contribute to its causes. I hold a graduate certificate in public health, community preparedness and disaster response, and prior to entering public service, I spent 10 years as an engineer and program manager for a global aerospace company, supervising a team of other engineers and managing a multimillion‐dollar budget. This background has prepared me to work with city staff, other first responders and the community to establish effective response plans for extreme weather events and other possible impacts of our changing climate such as wildfires, to ensure the safety of all area residents. As mayor, I will work with our regional partners to ensure we have realistic and comprehensive emergency plans in Austin and coordinated with surrounding jurisdictions.
With my education, I understand specifically the role of the mayor in disaster response within the overall well‐defined structure of a response, in particular to be a key in crisis communication, as a representative of the area in coordination with other areas, and as an authority as needed to make resources available. Mayor Will Wynn provided a great model for the role and responsibility of mayor in responding to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. He was in regular contact with leaders in other cities and oversaw the quick setup of a major operation to accommodate evacuees in Austin that essentially created a small city at the Convention Center. He did it with astute ability and compassion, greeting each individual on each plane that came in from New Orleans.

Mayor Steve Adler
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?
My top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin are: 1) carbon neutrality for the City of Austin by 2020, 2) net-zero community-wide greenhouse gases by 2050 and 3) building a resilient and adaptive community in the face of undeniable climate change. I will continue to undertake these important actions, among others, towards those goals: pushing for as much renewable energy as is possible (consistent with our affordability goals that help protect lower income Austinites), closing the coal plant, facilitating electrification of and actually electrifying cars and buses (both public fleets and private vehicles) including expanding the number and location of charging stations, new mobility technologies, and procurement, keeping Austin on the leading edge of the Zero Waste movement, advancing large scale battery research and testing, and advancing the conservation and supply distribution practices for Austin Energy and our water utility (including development of new business models for each as called for in the Water Forward plan). Austin has long taken steps in these or similar directions, especially in recent years. But city leadership, together with stakeholder groups, needs to keep pressing forward.

2. As mayor, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
As Vice-Chair of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee, I have and will continue to support closing our remaining coal plant and minimizing reliance on gas plants, increasing the renewable power generation in our portfolio, promote energy efficiency and distributed and community renewable power generation, development of new battery and storage capabilities and technologies, expansion of automotive electrification and supportive infrastructure. Please see the response to the preceding question, no. 1.
Ultimately, we need a new business plan for Austin Energy that is less dependent on selling generated power. In the meantime, this 10-1 council has passed the most cost-effective utility-scale solar contracts in the world, at the time they were passed. More than half of the city’s energy will be renewable by 2020, and we have set aggressive goals to reach 65% by 2027 and to push for 75% in that same time frame.
Austin’s solar advocates should be proud of their role in our progress to date. In 2016, Austin Energy had 1,000 mobile installations of rooftop solar- more than the combined total for all prior (8) years of the rebate program. In 2017, our 10-1 Council approved an update to Austin’s Resource, Generation and Climate Protection Plan affirming our strong commitments, laid out above, through 2027. And later this year, the Council will have an opportunity to consider a landmark solar purchase power agreement – for 144 MWs – that would allow us to exceed our local goal of 110 MW by 2020 and meet 72% of our total local solar goal for 2025.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes. Rooftop solar can get expensive and the upfront cost has been prohibitive for many. It is important to look at equitable access to renewable energy, in all respects, including whether and how renters and low- income families, as well as Austinites utilizing our Customer Assistance Program might participate. I have enthusiastically gone out into the community to promote targeted programs like Austin Energy’s Community Solar program, which provides access to locally-generated solar energy for residential customers who wants to promote clean, local energy – that includes renters, homeowners with shaded roofs, or anyone who doesn’t want to install and maintain a rooftop solar system with support for those that need financial assistance to participate. Such a policy meets both our renewable energy generation goals and our underlying goal in all things to promote equity.

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes, I have been consistently supportive of utility investment programs, including our rebate program. We must continue to do this in a way that appropriately calibrates rebates to maximize participation in community solar while keeping overall utility rates as affordable as possible for low income families and individuals.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
Austin has taken on an ever greater and increasingly visible leadership role among cities in Texas, the country, and internationally through the C40 Cities alliance and the Under2 Coalition, and we have a responsibility to expand and elevate further this role. International leadership has now expects Austin to take an increasing leadership role. Since taking office, I have been proud to be an environmental Mayor. I’ve traveled to Paris and Mexico City, and around the US, to represent our city at climate meetings to share best practices, learn, and help build momentum power the voice for climate change mitigation. Adhering to the Mayors Compact that I was privileged to sign – C40 Cities and the Under2 Coalition of international, subnational governments, and the Paris Climate Accords – are top priorities. Our city is assuming a leadership role in climate change other ways, too. Two recent
examples would be our successfully competing for Bloomberg Foundation environmental grants and our recent electrification/equity project that received a best practice national award from the United States Conference of Mayors. I have worked for us to achieve both. I have been assuming increasing leadership roles among my peer mayors in these organizations to help build momentum and alliances in this space. I have also been clear, both in the larger national conversations about refugees and migrants, and in specific instances such as our welcoming response to Harvey evacuees, that displaced persons, including those displaced by extreme weather events, are welcome in our city. This of course, also means being prepared ourselves. In addition to our own city’s Climate Resilience Action Plan for City of Austin Assets and Operations, the City of Austin has several plans in place or underway to increase the climate resilience and adaptation of the community at large. Those plans include Imagine Austin, the forthcoming Water Forward Plan, the Onion Creek and Williamson Creek Buyout Programs, our Heat Island Mitigation
Program, the Austin/Travis County Community Wildfire Protection Plan, City of Austin Hazard Mitigation Plan, Austin Urban Forest Plan, Austin Energy Weatherization Assistance and the Get Back in Business (Small Business Preparedness Program).

Travis Duncan
1. What are your top three priorities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Austin, and what actions would you take to implement needed changes?

Regional Environmental Toxins Ban – As public servants, it is our duty to ensure the public safety. This includes the protection of fundamental liberties and sovereignty of every being and the planet itself. A core principle of public safety protection is to ensure the sustainability and harmony with our planet, to protect the
rights of future generations to self-determine. If we damage or alter the natural environment such that it limits their options and even threatens their very existence, that is a violation of their sovereignty on Earth. It is not one individual’s or entity’s right to infringe upon any other sovereign individual or entity’s rights to have access to Earth’s resources. This planet is not owned by any one single individual. Therefore, under the authority given to us by the 9th amendment of the United States Constitution, and Article 2 of the Texas Constitution, I will lead our legal action to protect public safety as our number one priority, by asserting that all damaging environmental toxins must cease being created and distributed, in Austin and any regional are that is ecologically connected to Austin. This would include the burning of fossil fuels, the use of petro-based/non-biodegradable single-use plastics, soil chemicals that disturb balance, neurotoxins (& more) in water supply, fracked gas, toxic concretes and building materials, air-polluting air conditioners, genetically modified foods, and any other product or thing that is damaging to collective human health, even when used by an individual. For example, it would be a violation of fundamental rights for someone to dump toxic fertilizers or pesticides in their yard, because it would likely cause the neighbors to not be able to grow organic foods in their garden. This very simple principle of full-sovereignty adherence will actually cause us to be more considerate of our choices we may think are individual, but have a larger collective effect on the greater health of humanity, and so it is reasonable to assert that we protect the maximum human expression of life, especially given that when these factors become multiplied and compounded, they begin to cause massive scale damages to the Earth (this is not helped by the
maximum sales driven industrial behavior). We will also be given tremendous innovative opportunity to solve these major problems locally (create non-toxic substitutes) and then market these products to the world. For those who are driven by profit, we can also accommodate within the reasonable bounds of Earth-Protection and Full-Sovereignty of ALL life. Austin, Texas being the first city on the planet to take this bold step would catalyze the innovation and cutting-edge evolution locally, giving us more international notoriety.

Zero-Emissions Transportation – Our transportation needs are very clear, and in other forums I have laid our plan to accelerate our construction of new projects by maximizing cooperative human energy, incentives, and regenerative investment. Whereas the traditional ways of building things may take years, we can accomplish within weeks with these new methods. In addition, we have laid out a proposal for an open-source solution-modelling platform on which any citizen can contribute their ideas for transit infrastructure plans, and then the public can interact and comment, revise and republish, and collectively ‘vote’ on the ideas that project the highest promise. The purpose of this platform is to increase our probabilities of finding the absolute best solutions. The platform serves as a sort of Google Maps/IBM Watson/Sims game, infused with the latest AI, quantum computing, machine learning, intuitive design, fluid/liquid/rank-choice democracy engagement tools, so our broader population can be the source of the solution. We obviously need a smart, quick, quiet, and innovative urban rail, which will be completely renewable, in addition to a full conversion of our bus fleet to zero-emissions. While we are switching our fleet, we will likely need to explore autonomous-enabled vehicles, and smaller pod type of vehicles that can automatically pick anyone up at their home and shuttle them quickly and safely to the nearest train or bus stop. Once we have urban rail running on every major street, multi-level, dedicated roadways, autonomously interacting vehicles, & constant-flow transit, we will nearly eliminate the need for personal cars as a mode of transportation. However, in the immediate transition period, we should develop a maximum incentive program to any household who converts their personal vehicles to zero-emissions & autonomous-enabled (this part is crucial, because rapid advancements in this technology are swiftly arriving, mainly in the area of software and coordination with the existing roadways, and we need to be as prepared for this as possible). The whole point of all of this is maximize
freedom of transportation and efficiency of system so that our air can be completely clean and our bodies can be stress free. All of this plan includes, obviously, the need for protected and unobstructed pedestrian, bike and scooter roadways. The plan is to make every place accessible to everyone using public transit and self-powered mobility, in a way that is completely safe and efficient for all involved.

Sell Fayette, Plant Hemp – Some estimates place our (Austin Energy) stake in the Fayette Coal Plant at around $400,000,000. I will lead the effort to sell this ASAP, so we can recoup the most amount of money from this deal. Then, I recommend strongly that we take this money and invest in the purchasing of land for the purpose of growing hemp. Currently, this is illegal in Texas, which is in fact a violation of our Constitutional Rights and Natural Law Rights. However, we (Austin Energy) could purchase and manage hemp farms across the nation in states where it is legal. Some hemp farmers are seeing returns of $400-800 per acre of hemp. Hemp can be used for medicine, food, construction materials, biodegradable plastics, clothing, non-toxic cleaning supplies, and much more. In addition to this, and perhaps most importantly, hemp absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and remineralizers depleted soil. This can be utilized as a new revenue stream for Austin Energy, and will contribute to our carbon offset program planetwide. It’s important we perceive ourselves as in debt to the world, since we, with the Fayette Coal Plant, have been contributing to the negative outcomes of pollution. There are likely reparations that need to paid to the surrounding communities, and one way of accomplishing a ‘clean-up’ program is to plant hemp and profit-share with the locals. I’ve intentionally left this area broad, so it can be read as an approach, a way of doing things, not a detailed proposal. There is still much to consider. However, there is no doubt that investing $400,000,000 in hemp will yield higher (& ecologically regenerative) returns than Fayette ever could. This is about Climate Justice. On that note, I also advocate that we use some of profit from our hemp investments in lobbying strongly for the clearing of ALL marijuana convictions in the state of Texas, and liberate anyone currently illegally and immorally incarcerated.

2. As mayor, you will be a member of the Austin Energy Utility Oversight Committee. What will you do to make sure that Austin Energy takes the necessary steps to phase out its use of fossil fuels for power generation by 2030?
Lead 100% Renewable ASAP Campaign – We will accomplish 100% renewable energy by 2022 once I am mayor and we get our act together. This must include a complete phase out of our current polluting forms of energy, the decommissioning of all gas-line infrastructure, the complete and total divestment of all petrochemical investments and holdings, and of course the installation and innovation of new renewable sources of local production, like solar and other quantum technologies.
Innovation is KEY. We must establish a cooperative, people-owned, universally-accessible, innovation laboratory, as a part of our greater Profit-Sharing Contributionism Business Network, where every citizen is able to contribute their time and energy into the innovation of renewable energy generation technologies, energy storage, efficient transmission, grid resilience, propulsion, & anything else deemed valuable to research and develop. Experts will lead teams of people in creating the next wave in the energy movement. There are NO limits, and we must allow the creative energy of the people to thrive! We have the facilities and the resources to provide, and the people will innovate beyond our wildest comprehension. Money Does Nothing. People Do Everything.

3. Despite declining costs of solar, many low income residents and multi-family housing tenants are challenged to participate in Austin Energy’s existing rooftop solar programs. Do you think it is important to expand access to solar by developing targeted programs and policies at Austin Energy? Please explain.
Yes, this is of crucial importance. In fact, in 2016, I came before city council to offer a plan to get solar at less cost, at a faster rate, in a way that has completely equitable, and would dramatically accelerate our installations and generations, while catalyzing a massive boom in our solar industry. They did not listen…
This plan includes three main planks: (1) People’s Power Plant (2) Wholesale (3) Cooperative Labor.
1) This plan essentially involves the people of Austin, the broader Austin Energy customer (shareholder) base, purchasing and owning the source of power generation, and generating as much of it locally as possible. AE has nearly 500,000 customers, of which pay monthly on their bills for the cost of fuel/power generation. This plan gradually and expediently reroutes this money toward the purchasing of solar panels & associated necessary equipment for the purpose of installing on any willing home or business rooftop. Localizing the solar helps with the efficiency of transmission (smaller loss), and empowers customers with eligible rooftops to get an immediate discount on their bill for allowing the PPP to use their roof without personally investing any money.
2) Wholesale purchases will enable us to get costs below $1 per watt for the materials. We will be able to work directly with manufacturers, and partner to find the best possible arrangement for this exciting transition. Let’s remember that the ultimate goal of the solar industry is to maximize the solar installed, not to make the most money from it across longer periods of time. This is an item on a checklist we need to get resolved and move on better for it.
3) Any shareholder (customer) of Austin Energy will receive free electricity in exchange for 3-6 hours per week of donated volunteer contribution, time and energy, in any needed capacity (accommodates all), to the installation projects. Much in the beginning of their time will include training, which will be constantly happening, mostly on the job. Imagine 10,000 volunteers installing solar panels across the city every weekend. Frankly, when led by a competent and safety conscious team of experts, any able-bodied person can install solar panels.
This plan dramatically increases the rate of solar installs, at a fraction of the cost, while engaging, training, and educating the broader people with practical and professional skills. We will build a sense of pride in our community by maximizing our contributing impact. If Austin is truly a place that is environmentally conscious, we will show it through our determined and relentless actions, not by our passive plans and weightless rhetoric. If we claim to believe in Austin that this is as high of a moral imperative to the human species, we WILL take much stronger action. I do believe Austin is ready for this type of program, and we have lacked the leadership and creativity to do it, until NOW. Now we have this chance to elect me as the mayor of Austin. I am determined and relentless in my dedication to the best ideas! Let’s improve upon this plan by sourcing the limitless genius of the people of Austin!

4. Local, distributed scale solar installation has produced values to the utility, community and the local economy. Do you support the expansion of utility investment programs (including rebates) for installing solar locally within the Austin Energy territory? Please explain.
Yes, in fact, the People’s Power Plant can be thought of as a massive utility scale installation. Using the already available local roof space in our city prevent loss of transmission when compared to a solar farm located in a rural area. This is where our engineers will have the unique and invigorating challenge of innovating how the electrical grid interprets this new localized energy production.
I do NOT support more PPAs with any private solar farm or wind farm (inherently extractive). This model has run its course. The only PPAs we need are with highly advanced, EMP resilient technologies like the quantum tech I have presented to the people of Austin. Such is the case if these technologies are not yet directly purchasable for ownership, but require advanced knowledge to operate. Over time, an equity model may present itself.
The entire point is to, over time, eliminate the cost of electricity and all energy, so the resource becomes completely DE commodified. This transition will obviously factor in the employment considerations of thousands, as well as the responsible transference of system design, so we can ultimately fortify and improve our grid stability, which is of utmost importance the protection of many generations of human life thriving on this planet.

5. What specific role and responsibility do you see Austin taking in responding to local, regional and international impacts of climate change, including preparing for large numbers of people displaced by extreme weather events?
Austin has the opportunity, and the obligation, to catalyze a planet-wide acceleration in our collective effort as the human species to become harmonious with the planet we’re blessed to inhabit. This starts with being absolutely honest, truthful, and factual with ourselves. The history around energy use and industrial behavior must be directly confronted, with clear vision and compassion. We must reassert what the latest science is telling us, and act accordingly. We must be prepared for a multitude of scenarios.
Specifically, as it relates to Austin, Texas, our efforts as stated in every section above will be crucial, especially the aspect of legal protections for a non-polluted planet, as must be asserted for ALL life across all perceivable time periods. We will set the legal precedent for forcing the sovereignty-violators to cease polluting activity ASAP, included with regenerative-reparations investments.
In parallel, our move toward Universal Resource Access and the transcendence of extractive taxes, will be of utmost importance in playing a role of liberating all 1,000,000 Austinites (and growing), so we will be liberated from the wage clock, be empowered and self-determining, and will all live our maximum purpose in life. This will inevitably include many solutions leaders for our planets larger issues, like ocean acidification, mass species extinctions, sea level rise, massive pollutions of microplastics, genetic modifications, and so much more. We need to ensure that we increase the probabilities of humanity surviving, and that requires us as a city, a tribe, to ensure that every single one of our people reaches the fullest potential and manifests their genius. With the entire planet still perpetuating the antiquated scarcity driven currency- extraction models, Austin will create something entirely new and catalyze a planet-wide shift toward an abundant and harmonious reality for ALL.
I am grateful for the opportunity to serve You.